4 prospects the Red Sox need to consider using as trade bait this offseason

The Red Sox have a good amount of work to do on their roster if they really want to contend next season.
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Nathan Hickey

Every team needs catchers and ones that can actually hit are a luxury few organizations have available to them. However, after the Red Sox got a gift when Kyle Teel fell to them in this year's draft, offensive-minded catching prospect Nathan Hickey became very expendable.

Again, it is never a problem to have too many prospects at a given position, but Hickey is a unique case given that it is becoming increasingly apparent that he probably shouldn't be playing behind the plate going forward. In 2023, Hickey gave up nearly 200 stolen bases this season while catching only 22 would-be base stealers which is decidedly not great. He can really hit, though, and his .858 OPS this season is a testament to his ability to draw walks and hit for power. Sending Hickey to a team in need of a legit bat that has a slim chance of sticking at catcher could help get a deal done this offseason while Teel develops into Boston's catcher of the future.

Chase Meidroth

One thing that many teams are valuing increasingly highly in the modern game of baseball is versatility. Going into what should be a crucial offseason for the Red Sox, Boston should utilize the depth they have at middle infield in the minors and consider trading versatile infielder Chase Meidroth.

There is a lot to like about Meidroth at the plate as he has shown a real knack for drawing walks at a high rate and his hit tool over has been impressive in his first two seasons of pro ball. The power numbers have been fairly lackluster, but Meidroth still could provide a lot of value as an old school #2 hitter or a guy in the bottom third of a lineup that gives opposing pitchers fits.

The nice thing about Meidroth is that he has seen time at shortstop, third base, and second base in the minors. While there are plenty of folks that think he will need to play second if he wants to play every day, sending him to a team that values his positional flexibility and could move him around may be the best long-term plan especially given how crowded the Boston infield looks for the foreseeable future.

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