Former Red Sox reliever Jim Corsi passes away from cancer

8 Mar 1999: Pitcher Jim Corsi #41 of the Boston Red Sox pitching the ball during the Spring Training game against the Minnesota Twins at the City of Palms Park in Fort Myers, Florida. The Twins defeated the Red Sox 6-3. Mandatory Credit: Brian Bahr /Allsport
8 Mar 1999: Pitcher Jim Corsi #41 of the Boston Red Sox pitching the ball during the Spring Training game against the Minnesota Twins at the City of Palms Park in Fort Myers, Florida. The Twins defeated the Red Sox 6-3. Mandatory Credit: Brian Bahr /Allsport /
facebooktwitterreddit

Red Sox Nation mourns the loss of former reliver Jim Corsi

Former Boston Red Sox pitcher Jim Corsi has died at 60 after battling Stage IV liver cancer and colon cancer, reports WBZ’s Steve Burton. Corsi passed away peacefully with his family by his side.

The Newton, Mass. native spent 10 seasons pitching in the majors with five different teams. He owned a 3.25 ERA in 368 career games.

After graduating from Newton North High School, Corsi pitched for Division II St. Leo University in Florida. He was selected by the New York Yankees in the 25th round of the 1982 MLB Amateur Draft. He pitched in the Rookie league and Single-A levels during two years in the Yankees organization.

Corsi spent two seasons in the Red Sox farm system before moving on to the Oakland A’s organization in 1987. He made his major league debut with Oakland the following year and was a part of their World Series championship team in 1989. Corsi was a teammate of former Red Sox pitcher and current NESN analyst Dennis Eckersley during his time in Oakland.

He spent one season with the Houston Astros before briefly returning to the A’s. Corsi was a member of the Florida Marlins when the franchise debuted as an expansion team in 1993. He spent two seasons with the organization, one of which was in their minor league system, before returning for third stint in Oakland.

Coris spent three seasons with the Red Sox from 1997-1999. He went 9-7 with a 3.35 ERA in 134 appearances in Boston. Corsi pitched exclusively out of the bullpen during his tenure with the club and notched two saves.

The right-hander logged three scoreless innings over two appearances in the 1998 ALDS against the Cleveland Indians. Corsi didn’t allow a run in five career postseason innings.

Corsi gave an emotional interview with Burton prior to his passing where he revealed his battle with cancer and urged the public to receive routine colonoscopies.

"“I made a mistake when I was younger by not getting a colonoscopy,” said Corsi. “I should have done it. If you’re out there, don’t wait. Don’t be stupid. I was a professional athlete and thought I was invincible, strong. You’re not. Cancer is not prejudice to anybody.”"

This is a tragic ending to a great story about a local kid who achieved his dream of pitching in the big leagues. This is the latest of far too may reminders that Cancer sucks. It’s heartbreaking that this devastating disease has taken away another person who was clearly beloved by so many who knew him. Hopefully his words of wisdom about routine colonoscopies will resonate with others so that early detection can help them avoid a similar fate.

Next. 10 greatest hitters in Red Sox history. dark